DEQ Materials Management Grants Program

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality

Suggest an update

Grant amount: US $1,500 - US $148,550

Deadline: Oct 4, 2020 11:59pm PDT

Applicant type: Indigenous Group Government Entity Nonprofit

Funding uses: Project / Program

Location of project: Oregon

Location of residency: Oregon

View website    Save Need help writing this grant?

Overview:

The Department of Environmental Quality’s Materials Management Program funds projects on a yearly basis that support Oregon’s 2050 Vision for materials management. Since 1991, DEQ has awarded over $9 million in materials management grants. Grants are for projects that reduce impacts across the full cycle of materials and products. The lifecycle of materials and products includes product design, raw material extraction, manufacturing, transport, consumption, use, reuse, repair, recovery through recycling, composting or anaerobic digestion, and disposal. 

Project Grants

What are Project Grants and what types of projects are eligible?

We need to recognize that Earth’s resources are finite, Oregonians live within the limits of our sustainable share of the world’s natural resources. Supported projects will take into account the full impacts of materials throughout their life cycle. Supported projects will use renewable resources at levels that can be sustained in perpetuity while maintaining the resiliency of natural systems. Supported projects will help all Oregonians have access to the knowledge, capabilities, resources and services required to use materials responsibly.

Project grants are for any project that reduces waste generation, promotes reuse, or recovers solid waste through recycling, composting or anaerobic digestion. For example, DEQ has supported projects linked to changing processes or materials to prevent waste; creating reuse infrastructure; processing and other waste prevention, recycling, composting and waste recovery initiatives. For specific examples of recently funded projects, visit the Materials Management Grants webpage. Please consult this list of examples and ideas of projects that could be funded as well. 

Project examples that prevent the wasting of food:

  • Pilot to test impacts of changing merchandising and promotional practices (e.g., changing produce displays to reduce loss, offering buy one, get one later instead of buy one, get one free today).
  • Projects to pilot test measuring and tracking wasted food in institutional kitchens as means for identifying why food is being wasted and to inform the development of strategies to reduce wasted food.
  • Equipment or services that prevent or reduce the wasting of food in buffet restaurants or institutional (university, primary/secondary schools, hospital) dining rooms, such as implementing tray less dining, switching to smaller plates, changes to food displays, and elementary school food choices.
  • Changing elementary school food choices or changing school cafeteria practices to “offer” rather than “serve.

What is a “Focus Area” Project?

DEQ is awarding Focus Area points to encourage grant proposals that further the current priorities for implementing Oregon’s 2050 Vision for materials management.

A proposal may receive Focus Area points for the following type of proposal:

  • This year, the Grant Program aims to foster new partnerships between CBOs and environmental organizations in Oregon.
    • Focus points will be given to projects involving two or more organizations where materials management outcomes would assist a local community in Oregon. The implementation must also include extensive involvement from a CBO that is representative of or has successfully served the target community. Applicant must demonstrate that the project would foster or establish a new partnership with a CBO (e.g., a partnership formed January 1, 2016 or later).
    • Projects that fall within this focus area can earn additional focus points if the applicant or CBO has never received an award from the Materials Management Grant Program.

Focus Area definitions and examples:

Community-Based Organizations (CBOs)

For the purposes of the focus area, a CBO is defined as an incorporated non-profit organization (including, but not limited to, environmental justice networks, faith based organizations, grassroots level regional advocacy groups and representatives of the business community); and tribal governments and tribal organizations of the federally recognized nine tribes in Oregon. Other groups may be considered depending on the focus of the project. 

CBO Involvement

Extensive involvement of a CBO means that the CBO is involved in several actions or stages of the implementation of the project. Merely having the CBO submit a general letter of support stating that the project is a good idea will not be sufficient to be considered for focus points.

New Partnership

To be considered for focus points, applicants partnering with a CBO can demonstrate that the partnership was formed within the last three years by submitting a letter signed by both parties affirming that the parties have not previously worked together on a contract before January 1, 2016, or other documentation affirming this statement.

Examples of projects

  • Food waste prevention educational project between a nonprofit or a local government, and a CBO of the region.
  • A nonprofit expert in repairing clothes hosting a series of repair workshops in the community represented by a community based organization.
  • A local government and a tribal government purchasing recycling infrastructure for a community that does not have access to curbside recycling.
  • Providing bilingual services for hearings, workshops, and outreach related to materials managements projects in non-English speaking communities through work between a CBO and a nonprofit.
  • Deconstruction trainings in a community with the help of a local government.

What are Planning Grants?

Planning grants are for local Solid Waste Management Plans and Materials Management Plans. Local governments may receive grant funds to develop their own plan or may contract with private individuals, consulting firms, nonprofit organizations or others. Please contact the DEQ Headquarters staff for assistance in choosing and developing the appropriate plan to meet your goals.

A Solid Waste Management Plan is a local guide to managing the recovery and disposal of solid waste. These planning efforts help ensure safe management of waste and provide a path toward achieving wasteshed and statewide recovery goals and an opportunity for community engagement in helping to reduce solid waste. This type of plan is required if a local jurisdiction or private party intends to build a new solid waste facility.

A Materials Management Plan may incorporate the Solid Waste Management Plan but more holistically addresses impacts of materials across their full lifecycle, including design, production and use in addition to recovery and disposal of discards. For example, a Materials Management Plan might include strategies to reduce generation of waste or use of toxics, reuse of products or purchase of more durable products.

You can learn more about this opportunity by visiting the funder's website.

Eligibility:

  • Project Grants
    • Who may apply for a Materials Management Project Grant?
      • Government entities in Oregon responsible for materials management. This includes but is not limited to cities, counties, metropolitan service districts, regional parks districts, sanitary districts and county service districts.
      • 501(c)(3) and (c)(4) nonprofit organizations registered in Oregon (please see additional application requirements).
      • Federally-recognized tribal governments located in Oregon.
      • Organizations created through intergovernmental agreements as allowed by ORS 190.010.
      • Public universities, colleges, community colleges and public schools, but only for projects that prevent the wasting of food. See below for “food waste prevention” project examples.
      • Eligible applicants may partner with other public or private entities or individuals.
    • Project costs that DEQ funds may be used for (but are not limited to):
      • Administrative costs, such as travel, office expenses, and overhead
      • Salaries and benefits for project personnel and payments to consultants or contractors
      • Publications and other printed materials
      • Machinery, vehicles, equipment, signs, containers and project-related supplies
  • Planning Grants
    • Who may apply for a planning grant?
      • Governments responsible for materials management are eligible to apply. This includes Federally-recognized tribal governments located in Oregon, counties, cities, metropolitan service districts, regional parks districts, sanitary districts, county service districts, and regional air quality control authorities.
    • Plan costs that DEQ funds may be used for (but are not limited to):
      • Administrative costs, such as travel, office expenses, and overhead
      • Salaries and benefits for plan personnel and payments to consultants or contractors personal services costs for consultants or contractors
      • Publications and other printed materials

Ineligibility:

  • Project Grants: What costs are NOT covered?
    • Costs incurred for activities outside the scope of the grant agreement; however, DEQ reserves the right to reassign unused funds, due to finishing tasks under budget, to new/other tasks that fulfill or advance the mission of the Materials Management Program.
    • Costs for which payment has been or will be received under another financial assistance program. (This includes funding that another organization is passing through to you the Grantee.)
    • Costs incurred before issuance of, or after the completion date of a signed grant agreement with DEQ, unless expressly authorized by DEQ in the grant agreement
    • Ordinary operating expenses of local government (i.e. staff time that is already a part of your current work)
    • DEQ permit fees or costs incurred for solid waste facility closure
  • Planning Grants What costs are NOT covered?
    • Costs incurred for activities outside the scope of the grant agreement; however, DEQ reserves the right to reassign unused funds, due to finishing tasks under budget, to new/other tasks that fulfill or advance the mission of the Materials Management Program.
    • Costs for which payment has been or will be received under another financial assistance program. (This includes funding that another organization is passing through to you the Grantee.
    • Costs incurred before issuance of, or after the completion date of a signed grant agreement with DEQ, unless expressly authorized by DEQ in the grant agreement
    • Ordinary operating expenses of local government
    • DEQ Permit Fees or costs incurred for solid waste facility closure
    • Capital costs (Machinery, vehicles, equipment, signs, containers and project-related supplies)