Mechanistic and Hemodynamic Basis of Diffuse White Matter Disease in Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia (VCID)(R01 - Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

US Dept. of Health & Human Services: National Institutes of Health (NIH)

View website Save this grant

Deadline: Oct 4, 2024

Grant amount: Up to US $2,500,000

Fields of work: Dementia & Alzheimer’s Disease

Applicant type: Nonprofit, Government Entity, Indigenous Group, For-Profit Business

Funding uses: Research

Location of project: United States, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico Show all

Location of residency: United States, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico Show all

Overview:

NOTE: All applications are due by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization. 

(Reissue of RFA-NS-16-021, PAR-18-413, RFA-NS-19-039) Diffuse brain white matter disease is highly prevalent in the elderly, and has been clinically associated with vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) in both men and women. Diffuse white matter disease is thought to include a variety of pathologies including demyelination and/or fiber loss due to multifocal infarction and local ischemia. It is often accompanied by arteriosclerosis in deep penetrating arteries, multiple infarcts in the basal ganglia, brainstem or cerebellum. Though most commonly extending out from the periventricular surfaces, it may also occur in subcortical white matter. Diffuse white matter disease is typically detected in clinical settings as hyperintensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or signal loss on computed tomography x-ray (CT) scan; diffuse white matter disease can be detected histologically as well, for example in human pathology and in studies using animal models. Despite the prevalence and potential significance of white matter disease for cerebrovascular disease etiology and cognitive outcomes, much remains to be learned about the cellular and molecular causes, regional vulnerability, and progression over time. The physiological consequences of diffuse white matter disease on local axon and neural circuit function are almost completely unknown. The purpose of this FOA is to address some of the many gaps in knowledge of the biologic mechanisms of the commonly occurring, cerebrovascular disease and age-related diffuse white matter disease at the molecular, cellular, tissue and brain circuit level. The ultimate goal of this fundamental research is to inform future efforts to reduce the burden of illness due to age-related vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia.

We've imported the main document for this grant to give you an overview. You can learn more about this opportunity by visiting the funder's website.

US Dept. of Health & Human Services: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
FUNDER

Your history with this funder
0
SAVED OPPORTUNITIES
No saved opportunities from this funder yet
FUNDER NOTES
Save this opportunity to add notes...
CONTACTS
Save this opportunity to add contacts...

Other Funding Opportunities from Us Dept. Of Health & Human Services: National Institutes Of Health (Nih)

Forecasted Funding Opportunities from Us Dept. Of Health & Human Services: National Institutes Of Health (Nih) help icon

Find funders like US Dept. of Health & Human Services: National Institutes of Health (NIH)

See funders proven to support nonprofits like yours.

No credit card required.
instrumentl testimonial face

"Winning 30% more grants thanks to Instrumentl was a huge morale boost. My confidence continues to grow."

Linda Rucker, Grant Writer

This page was last reviewed April 07, 2024 and last updated April 07, 2024