OWEB Monitoring Grants

Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB)


Grant amount: Unspecified amount

Anticipated deadline: Oct 29, 2019 5:00pm PDT

Applicant type: Indigenous Group Government Entity Nonprofit

Funding uses: Research

Location of project: Oregon

Location of residency: Oregon

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Overview:

Overview

OWEB supports efforts for comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of restoration investments, which should include but not be limited to physical, chemical, and biological evaluation. A well-designed monitoring program will:

  • Determine whether restoration actions were designed and implemented properly.
  • Determine whether the project’s restoration objectives were met.
  • Provide new information on the restoration action and the ecosystem functions and processes that it was intended to affect.
  • Determine needed refinements to restoration actions.

Environmental monitoring is the systematic collection of information used to assess the current condition and trend of environmental or performance indicators. Monitoring can be as simple as returning to a restoration site to be sure a culvert is still functioning properly; it can be as complex as assessing multiple parameters in a watershed to determine how overall watershed processes and functions change over time.

Monitoring Types

Status and Trend

  • Description. Monitoring made at a regular interval to determine long-term patterns of a parameter(s),and to assess conditions relative to specific criteria. A component may involve collecting baseline data, if none exists.
  • Activities. These can include monitoring/surveys targeting habitat, stream, vegetation, macroinvertebrates, juvenile fish, adult fish, other biologicals, invasive species, soil, water quantity, and water quality.

Project Effectiveness

  • ​Description. Monitors effectiveness of a restoration project(s) in meeting its biological and ecological objectives. A component may involve collecting baseline data to establish representative conditions before restoration is implemented.
  • Activities. These can include habitat surveys, stream surveys, vegetation, macroinvertebrates, juvenile fish, adult fish, other biological monitoring, invasive species, soil surveys, water quantity, and water quality.​

Landscape Effectiveness

  • Description. Measures environmental parameters to determine the effectiveness of restoration actions in creating desired habitat condition change(s) at a large geographical scale.
  • Activities. These can include monitoring/surveys targeting habitat, stream, vegetation, macroinvertebrates, juvenile fish, adult fish, other biologicals, invasive species, soil, water quantity, and water quality.

Rapid Bio-Assessment

  • Description. The collection, compilation, analysis, and interpretation of biological data to facilitate management decisions and actions for control and/or mitigation of impairment. Assessments are rapid, streamlined, scientifically valid procedures for biological surveys that allow multiple site investigations in a field season, and quick turn-around of results for management decisions. A rapid bio-assessment (RBA) is different than a Technical Assistance (TA) assessment and survey because it is usually conducted in a particular area, many times, whereas a TA assessment is often a one-time stand-alone activity. In addition, an RBA follows specific protocols and usually involves hiring qualified contractors to complete the survey. RBA projects can be thought of as a “quick and dirty” method of evaluating fish distribution and abundance. The survey method was designed to sub-sample a certain percent of pool habitats (usually 20%) using a technique that covers large distances. RBAs describe the current distribution of fish, as well as collecting pool metrics and variations in habitat complexity. The data collected can be used to prioritize habitat restoration strategies and measure progress of future restoration activities.
  • Activities. These can include monitoring/surveys targeting habitat, stream, vegetation, macroinvertebrates, juvenile fish, adult fish, other biologicals, invasive species, soil, water quantity, and water quality.

You can learn more about this opportunity by visiting the funder's website.

Eligibility:

  • A regular grant applicant may be any person, tribe, watershed council, soil and water conservation district, not-for-profit institution, school, community college, state institution of higher education, independent not-for-profit institution of higher education, or political subdivision of this state that is not a state agency.
    • A state agency or federal agency may apply for funding under this section only as a co-applicant with one of the other eligible entities.
    • Any of these applicants or co-applicants may also serve as a fiscal agent for grants.
  • Applicants must demonstrate conformance with the following provisions:
    • Demonstrate knowledge of state and/or federally accepted monitoring protocols;
    • Provide assurance that an appropriate protocol will be used; and
    • Acknowledge that the results will be available to a state database.