Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans

Paul and Daisy Soros Foundation


Grant amount: Up to US $65,000

Deadline: Nov 1, 2018 11:00am PDT

Applicant type: Graduate Student

Funding uses: Fellowship

Location of project: Anywhere in the world

Location of residency: United States

Location of citizenship: United States

Age restriction: No more than 30 years of age

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Overview:

Every year, The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans supports thirty New Americans, immigrants or the children of immigrants, who are pursuing graduate school in the United States. 

Each Fellowship supports one to two years of graduate study in any field and in any advanced degree-granting program in the United States. Each award is for up to $25,000 in stipend support, as well as 50 percent of required tuition and fees, up to $20,000 per year, for one to two years. The first year of Fellowship funding cannot be deferred.

Most importantly, new Fellows join a strong community of current and past Fellows who all share the New American experience. There is an alumni association, The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellows Association (PDSFA), which actively engages current and past Fellows in events held across the country. For example, in 2015 the PDSFA held events with US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy (1998 Fellow) in both New York City and Washington, DC. In 2016, the PDSFA hosted events with Congressman Keith Ellison, Prabhjot Singh (2005 Fellow), Sachin Jain (2004 Fellow), Abdul El-Sayed (2012 Fellow), and Aarti Shahani (2010 Fellow) among others. They kicked 2017 off with an event in New York City co-hosted by the Marshall Scholars, which featured Thomas Friedman. 

The competition is merit-based. Selection criteria emphasize creativity, originality, initiative, and sustained accomplishment. The program values a commitment to the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The program does not have any quotas for types of degrees, universities or programs, countries of origin, or gender, etc. Unsuccessful applicants are welcome to reapply in subsequent years if they are still eligible.

What is required of Fellows?

Over the two years of the Fellowship, Fellows are required to attend the annual Fall Conference in New York City, which is fully paid for by the program. The Fall Conference takes place over a weekend in late October and is an opportunity for the new Fellows to get to know one another and the Fellowship staff, alumni, and community, celebrate, and examine the New American experience. In addition, the director or deputy director of the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships will visit each Fellow on their respective campus during the first fall semester of their Fellowship. Finally, Fellows are required to remain in good standing in their graduate program while receiving funding. At the close of their two years as an active fellow, Fellows must submit an exit report. More details on the visit and the requirements of the Fellowship are provided when selected applicants sign a contract with the Fellowship. 

You can learn more about this opportunity by visiting the funder's website.

Eligibility:

  • To be eligible for the Fellowship, you must meet the following requirements as of the November 1 application deadline:
    • New American Status​​:
      • The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans is a fellowship program intended for United States immigrants and children of immigrants.
      • To be eligible, an applicant’s birth parents must have both been born outside of the US as non-US citizens, and both parents must not have been eligible for US citizenship at the time of their births.
      • In addition, one of the following must be true of the applicant as of the November 1 application deadline:
        • Born in the US: You are a US citizen by birth and both of your parents were born abroad as non-US citizens.
        • Naturalized Citizen: You have been naturalized as a US citizen either on your own or as a minor child under the application of one of your parents.
        • Green Card: You are in possession of a valid green card.
        • Adopted: You were born outside of the US or one of its territories and were subsequently adopted by American parents, and were awarded US citizenship as a result of your adoption.
        • DACA: You have been granted deferred action under the government’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.
    • Academic Standing
      • The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans is a fellowship program intended for immigrants and children of immigrants who are pursuing full time graduate degrees at United States institutions.
      • Eligible applicants will have a bachelor’s degree as of the fall of 2018, and may be applying to graduate school as they are applying to the fellowship, or they may already be enrolled in the graduate program that they are seeking funding for as of the application deadline.
      • The fellowship program is open to all fields of study and fully accredited fulltime graduate degree programs. In order to be eligible for the 2018 fellowship, an applicant should be planning to be enrolled full time in an eligible graduate degree program at a US university for the full 2018-19 academic year.
      • Eligible applicants must not have begun the third year of the program that they are seeking funding for as of the November 1, 2017 deadline.
      • Applicants who have a previous graduate degree or who are in a joint-degree program are eligible.
    • Age
      • The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans is a fellowship program intended for students who are early in their careers.
      • All students must be 30 or younger as of the application deadline.
      • In order to be eligible for the 2018 fellowship an applicant must not have reached or passed their 31st birthday as of the application deadline.

Ineligibility:

  • Ineligible programs: Online programs, executive graduate programs, joint bachelors/master's programs, certificate programs, post-baccalaureate programs, graduate programs that are not in the United States, and graduate programs that are not fully accredited.