Program Area: Older Adults

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation


Grant amount: Unspecified amount

Deadline: Rolling

Applicant type: Nonprofit

Funding uses: General Operating Expense, Applied Project / Program, Capital Project

Location of project: Preferred: Israel, Hawaii, Maryland, San Francisco County, California, Counties in Illinois: Cook County, DeKalb County, DuPage County, Grundy County, Kane County, Kendall County, Lake County, McHenry County, Will County, Counties in New York: Bronx County, Kings County, New York County, Queens County, Richmond County, Counties in Pennsylvania: Bradford County, Carbon County, Columbia County, Lackawanna County, Luzerne County, Monroe County, Montour County, Northumberland County, Pike County, Schuylkill County, Sullivan County, Susquehanna County, Wayne County, Wyoming County Other eligible locations: Israel, United States

Location of residency: Israel, United States

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Overview:

Program Area: Older Adults

The Foundation supports organizations that help low-income and vulnerable older adults to age in their communities with independence and dignity. This is the largest single area of grantmaking by The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation.

Helping older adults to remain active and independent.

Goals

Serve the poorest and most vulnerable

The Foundation seeks to fund organizations that serve individuals and families who are well below the area median income level, and who have the highest levels of functional need – physical, mental, or financial.

Address the most basic needs

The Foundation prioritizes support for organizations or programs addressing the most basic needs. This includes food, housing, and income security, as well as long term care. Basic needs also include supports for activities of daily living and initiatives that will help to delay the onset of disability.

Primarily Capital Grants

Residential care facilities (Israel)

The Foundation makes capital grants to residential care facilities, including nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and "old age homes" that are implementing "culture change." The culture change model strives to make residential care facilities home-like. The individual, not the delivery of medical care or concern about liability, is at the center of all care plans and decisions.

Housing construction and repair

These are primarily capital projects to construct and rehabilitate housing for older adults. Home repair and home modification programs would also be included in this area. Housing construction and repair projects should be based on universal design and smart growth principles. All capital projects should have a plan for resident access to services, which is instrumental to the project.

Community-based facilities (US)

This includes senior centers, adult day program sites, shared use sites, and other facilities that provide non-institutional services and supports to older adults outside of the home. Funding would include capital grants for construction of new facilities or rehabilitation of existing facilities, as well as operating or program grants to support the facilities or their programs. Prioritization will be given to those facilities offering higher-level interventions, such as help with activities of daily living, health care, and medical monitoring. Community-based facility capital projects should be based on universal design and smart growth principles.

Community-based facilities (Israel)

This includes senior centers, shared use sites, and other facilities that provide multi-level services to older adults of all abilities. These are facilities intended to help older adults age in place. Particularly attractive are projects that are intended to host intergenerational activities or are part of a campus or complex of buildings that host intergenerational activities. Also attractive are projects intended to serve as the center of supportive community programming. Funding would include capital grants for construction of new facilities or rehabilitation of existing facilities, as well as operating or program grants to support the facilities or their programs. Prioritization will be given to those facilities offering higher-level interventions, such as help with activities of daily living, health care, and medical monitoring. Community-based facility capital projects should be based on universal design and smart growth principles.

Primarily Operating or Program Grants

Community-based services and supports to meet the most basic needs (US & Israel)

Community-based services and supports are essential to help older adults remain independent. They are low-cost relative to institutional care but are not sufficiently covered by public or private sources. This area specifically focuses on basic needs and higher level interventions. Foremost, this area will seek to fund projects that focus on elder homelessness and elder abuse emergency services, including shelter and the creation of supportive communities. In the US, the Weinberg Foundation also prioritizes projects that aim to reduce unnecessary hospitalizations and readmissions. Because maintenance of functional status is central to independence, interventions to delay the onset or progression of disability or dementia may also be covered. In Israel, the Foundation is particularly interested in the notion of “no wrong door”: participation in one program opens up the door to a range of supports and services necessary to help an older adult remain in the community as long as possible.

Informal caregiver support (US & Israel)

This area addresses information and resources for unpaid caregivers including friends and family. Respite and training are key needs among caregivers. Of particular interest are projects that are community based and involve the collaboration of a number of agencies or organizations.

Promotion of professional long-term care workforce (US)

By 2016, it is projected that the US will need four million direct care workers. This gap between demand for workers and supply will widen through 2030 as the baby boom generation ages. In addition to increasing the sheer numbers of direct care workers, we also need to improve quality. Efforts to improve quality must be multi-faceted, addressing training for employees and management, wages, retention, and workplace culture. This also overlaps with the Foundation’s workforce development goals to help individuals obtain and keep career track employment.

Developing an older adult workforce (Israel)

The Foundation is interested in reviewing and funding projects that train and place older adults in the mainstream labor market, open up labor market opportunities for older workers, and provide opportunities for older workers to develop and implement new sources of income.

Economic security (US)

This area focuses on low-income older adults facing the most challenging economic situations, including foreclosure, bankruptcy, or very low base income through Social Security or SSI, as well as issues associated with access to pensions. There are many federal, state, and local programs providing important direct services that may help older adults deal with their situation. This service array includes employment training, job placement, debt counseling, financial coaching and literacy, housing counseling, and benefits and health access.

You can learn more about this opportunity by visiting the funder's website.

Eligibility:

  • To be considered for funding, an organization must meet several requirements:
    • Be a nonprofit organization with 501 (c)(3), tax-exempt status.
    • Have audited or reviewed financial statements.
    • Be in operation for at least three years.
    • Provide direct services to low-income and vulnerable populations.
  • Grants are made in one of three categories: General Operating Support, Program Support, Capital Project.
  • Geographic focus:
    • National (capital grants only, with preference given to priority communities: Maryland, Northeastern Pennsylvania, Hawaii, Chicago, New York City, or San Francisco)
    • Israel
    • Program grants must have a foothold in a Foundation priority community: Maryland, Northeastern Pennsylvania, Hawaii, Chicago, New York City, or San Francisco

Ineligibility:

  • The Foundation does not fund:
    • Individuals
    • Arts and culture
    • Post-secondary scholarships
    • Debt reduction
    • Colleges and universities
    • Think tanks
    • Endowments
    • Political action groups
    • Annual appeals (in most cases)
    • Publications
    • Academic or health research
    • Fundraising events


About this funder:

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